Thompsons Solicitors is now representing 50 former patients of the consultant colorectal surgeon who is alleged to have performed surgical procedures that left individuals in excruciating pain, as well as suffering from medical complications.

Mr Tony Dixon worked at NHS Southmead hospital in Bristol and the private Spire Bristol hospital. Criticism has been made of his extensive use of invasive mesh implant surgery, including mesh rectopexy and Stapled Transanal Resection of the Rectum (STARR) operations.

Some patients have claimed that Mr Dixon made lewd and inappropriate comments. He has been suspended from work and is currently being investigated by his NHS Trust.

A BBC Inside Out West documentary looking into the allegations against Mr Dixon and speaking to patients to learn more about the negative consequences of mesh surgery is set to air next week.

"The claims of each former patient are different but a common theme is that they were not sufficiently warned of the possible complications and have all been left in worse pain after undergoing the surgical procedures."

Madeleine Pinschof
Medical Negligence Expert

Madeleine Pinschof, a senior medical negligence solicitor at Thompsons Solicitors said: "We are acting on behalf of 50 former patients of Mr Dixon, including three men, pursuing medical negligence claims.

"The fact that we have both male and female clients makes clear that the perception that mesh surgery procedures are only carried out on women is wrong.

"The claims of each former patient are different but a common theme is that they were not sufficiently warned of the possible complications and have all been left in worse pain after undergoing the surgical procedures.

"A key issue for us and for any learning from the problems with mesh (which as is clear from Sling the Mesh is extensive) is that regardless of where patients receive their treatment - NHS or private - the same standards of governance and safety should apply. This is central to our 'Patients before Profits' campaign so that no doctor can 'hide' and no non-NHS organisation who treats patients in the UK can fall short of the standards that the NHS holds itself to."