The family of a former boiler shop worker who died of mesothelioma has received substantial compensation. 

Steven Troop died in December 2015 after being diagnosed with the asbestos-related disease. 

Working for an agricultural machinery manufacturer between 1968 and 1979, Steven would sometimes have to wear gloves lined with asbestos, to protect his hands from the heat of a propane torch used. As the gloves became more worn, the asbestos lining would wear off onto his hands, which he would inadvertently touch his face with. 

He would also have to ensure new boilers were closed tightly so heat wouldn’t escape. This involved him using asbestos string to create a seal between the boiler and its lid. Sometimes, Steven would also repair boilers, which would disturb old asbestos used to lag them.

Several years after retirement, Steven began developing breathing difficulties and chest tightness. He was later diagnosed with mesothelioma, a fatal form of lung cancer. 

“We were proud to work alongside Andrew and the family to secure compensation and provide them with answers regarding why this happened.”

Steve Fitzwalter, Thompsons Solicitors

His brother, Andrew, contacted asbestos diseases specialists, Thompsons Solicitors, to make a compensation claim.

He said: “I’d never really heard of the word mesothelioma before this all happened. It was only when Thompsons began telling me about how many people have been affected by the disease that I realised the scale of the problem and that my brother wasn’t alone. 

“Thanks to Thompsons, I’ve realised that something can actually be done after an asbestos disease diagnosis. Employers shouldn’t be allowed to get away with exposing staff to asbestos, even if it was several decades ago, and I would advise anyone who’s suffered a similar loss to our family to speak with Thompsons and see if they can make a compensation claim.” 

Steve Fitzwalter, of Thompsons Solicitors, said: “Steven worked a variety of jobs during his employment with the manufacturer, but the common theme within these roles was exposure to toxic asbestos dust. While his exposure was in the 1960s and 70s, the effects of the disease didn’t manifest until decades later, leaving him and his family unsure of why he developed this cancer until it was too late. 

“We were proud to work alongside Andrew and the family to secure compensation and provide them with answers regarding why this happened.”